1. All but one of the following are goals in mixing and rerecording: (p. 412)

a. to establish aural perspective
b. to maintain the definition of each sound
c. to use EQ as a substitute for microphone technique
d. to add any special effects

2. The audio frequency response of videotape is: (p. 414)

a. wider than the frequency response of 16mm optical sound
b. wider than the frequency response of CDs
c. not as wide as the frequency response of AM radio
d. not as wide as the frequency response of 35mm optical sound

3. In mixing for radio, the AM and FM mixes should be different. (p. 413)

a. true
b. false

4. In mixing for film, the “unisound” approach: (p. 415)

a. places dialogue, music, and sound effects toward the center of the stereo field
b. compresses the overall sound and rolls off the bass at 50 Hz and the treble at 10,000 Hz
c. cuts all sound below 100 or 200 Hz and above 5,000 or 6,000 Hz
d. boosts dialogue, music, and sound effects in the presence range to ensure that their clarity is uniform [[[“presence range” OK?]]]

5. Which of the following is not good advice when layering sound? (p. 416)

a. position sounds to create relationships of space and distance
b. maintain a uniform loudness for all elements to avoid erratic perspectives
c. maintain spectral balance so that the aural space is properly weighted
d. vary sonic elements such as pitch, rhythm, timbre, and envelope to avoid masking or unintelligibility

6. A good mix can save a bad recording. (p. 421)

a. true
b. false

7. A comfortably loud monitor level that is usually considered optimal for mixdown is: (p. 421)

a. 65 dB-SPL
b. 85 dB-SPL
c. 95 dB-SPL
d. 105 dB-SPL

8. One of the following statements is not true about equalizing: (p. 396)

a. equalizing alters a sound’s harmonic structure
b. an absence of frequencies above 600 Hz adversely affects the intelligibility of consonants; an absence of frequencies below 600 Hz adversely affects the intelligibility of vowels
c. a 6 dB increase at 5,000 Hz gives an apparent increase of 3 dB to the overall mix
d. equal degrees of equalizing below 400 Hz and above 2,000 Hz are more perceptible than equal degrees of equalizing between those frequencies

9. Equalization used to help define instruments and keep masking to a minimum is called: (p. 423)

a. subtractive equalization
b. complementary equalization
c. shelving equalization
d. defined equalization

10. Flat midrange frequencies sound natural or smooth. They may also lack punch or color. (p. 398)

a. true
b. false

11. Low frequency boost adds power or weight to the sound. (p. 423)

a. true
b. false

12. High frequency roll-off can dull, muffle, veil, or distance sound. (p. 423)

a. true
b. false

13. Predelay is a major component of reverberation. (p. 427)

a. true
b. false

14. One of the following statements is not true. In a stereo field: (p. 429)

a. to highlight a solo, the instrument should be panned to the front center
b. the sound closest to the center and to us is the most predominant
c. sound placed to one side usually requires similarly weighted sound on the opposite side
d. a sound that is rear but center creates depth and a balance to the sound that is front and center

15. The difference between 3D sound and surround sound is that: (p. 429)

a. surround sound includes the dimension of height, and 3D sound does not
b. 3D sound increases sonic depth using the conventional two-speaker stereo array
c. surround sound requires three separate channels, and 3D requires only two
d. 3D sound can be simulated through a monaural matrix, and surround sound cannot

16. The placement of dialogue, sound effects, and music in the stereo (and surround sound) frame is called: (p. 429)

a. imaging
b. spectral balancing
c. perspective
d. localization

17. In stereo films and TV, the sound of the dialogue: (p. 439)

a. comes from the center of the screen, or close to it, regardless of where the actors are located
b. comes from wherever the actors are located
c. comes from wherever the actors are located except in a close-up, when it comes from the center of the screen
d. comes from wherever the actors are located but is compressed to avoid a sudden change in location because of an actor’s quick movement

18. One of the following is not a consideration in mixing surround sound: (p. 430)

a. sonic imaging should not rival what is on the screen
b. mix to the visual perspective on the screen
c. dialogue goes center channel and is usually not panned
d. the surround channel(s) and loudspeaker(s) are primarily for the music underscoring

19. All but one of the following are true about stereo-to-mono compatibility: (p. 448)

a. a wide and balanced stereo image played in mono may be center-heavy
b. avoid putting anything to the extreme left or right in a stereo mix if the mix is to be made mono-compatible
c. signals in phase in stereo cancel in mono, and signals out of phase in stereo add in mono
d. placement of voicings to the extreme left or right in stereo may result in a 3 dB or greater loss in their level(s), relative to the rest of the spectrum, when played in mono

20. In evaluating a master recording, all but one of the following are important in judging its sound quality: (p. 451)

a. tonal balance
b. linearity
c. dynamic range
d. definition

21. Rerecording is a term used in film mixing while mixing is generally used for music. (p.398)

a. true
b. false

22. The overriding challenge in mixing is to maintain aesthetic perspective. (p.399)

a. true
b. false

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